How to deal with being with your partner 24/7

Our global experience during the coronavirus pandemic has been challenging in more ways than one. At the forefront of most peoples’ minds are health and financial concerns, as well as anxiety over an unknown future. But with public officials urging us to practice social distancing, many couples are facing a new stressor: constant cohabitation for the foreseeable future. Being confined together will inevitably boost the potential for frustration, which is the last thing needed amidst the stress of the outbreak. The good news, however, is that even in the face of this incredibly complicated situation, there are several ways to mindfully foster a healthy relationship and manage our perspective.

Our global experience during the coronavirus pandemic has been challenging in more ways than one. At the forefront of most peoples’ minds are health and financial concerns, as well as anxiety over an unknown future. But with public officials urging us to practice social distancing, many couples are facing a new stressor: constant cohabitation for the foreseeable future. Being confined together will inevitably boost the potential for frustration, which is the last thing needed amidst the stress of the outbreak. The good news, however, is that even in the face of this incredibly complicated situation, there are several ways to mindfully foster a healthy relationship and manage our perspective.

Give yourself some alone time.

You shouldn’t have to lock yourself in the bathroom to get your own space. All of us cope with stress in different ways, and it’s important to take time individually to allow ourselves to process our emotions and recharge—whether we simply need to nap, read, meditate, or simply breathe. Above all else, make it a point to respect each others’ individual space and needs.

Stay in touch with others you love.

This is good relationship advice in general: when your world seems to shrink down to one person, it’s time to ensure you’re still reaching out to others. While you certainly shouldn’t be meeting friends and family in person, make sure you’re still contacting them online, whether that’s a phone call or chat session, to maintain crucial relationships and to help you keep your sense of connection.

Create structure.

Stability is a great way to combat both stress and depression. Sit down with your partner and decide when you will work from home, when you will plan mealtimes or exercise, and any other important moments of the day. Even a loose schedule can be a great coping mechanism. In addition, don’t forget to divide the household chores if you haven’t already, ensuring that neither of you does the majority of the work alone.

Practice effective communication.

It’s difficult to practice patience when you’re stressed, but try to express yourself in a positive way no matter how bad things get. Avoid communication pitfalls, like raising your voice, verbal attacks, complaining instead of problem-solving, and not truly listening to what the other is saying. Your goal should be to treat your partner with kindness and empathy whenever possible—especially now when the one thing you can control is how you treat each other.

Look at this as an opportunity to grow your relationship.

If you and your significant other don’t often get to spend time together due to busy work or social lives, this can be a great opportunity to have in-home dates. Learn new things via an online class, give each other massages, cook together and dine by candlelight, or tour a museum virtually. Spending time trying to get to know each other on a deeper level can help you maintain a sense of purpose and fun during your isolation.

Maintaining a healthy relationship is something you’ll need to constantly work on, but it will be more crucial than ever to support each other in the coming days. Despite the hardship or stress you feel now, focusing on your relationship may help the two of you emerge stronger than before when all is said and done.

Our global experience during the coronavirus pandemic has been challenging in more ways than one. At the forefront of most peoples’ minds are health and financial concerns, as well as anxiety over an unknown future. But with public officials urging us to practice social distancing, many couples are facing a new stressor: constant cohabitation for the foreseeable future. Being confined together will inevitably boost the potential for frustration, which is the last thing needed amidst the stress of the outbreak. The good news, however, is that even in the face of this incredibly complicated situation, there are several ways to mindfully foster a healthy relationship and manage our perspective.

Give yourself some alone time.

You shouldn’t have to lock yourself in the bathroom to get your own space. All of us cope with stress in different ways, and it’s important to take time individually to allow ourselves to process our emotions and recharge—whether we simply need to nap, read, meditate, or simply breathe. Above all else, make it a point to respect each others’ individual space and needs.

Stay in touch with others you love.

This is good relationship advice in general: when your world seems to shrink down to one person, it’s time to ensure you’re still reaching out to others. While you certainly shouldn’t be meeting friends and family in person, make sure you’re still contacting them online, whether that’s a phone call or chat session, to maintain crucial relationships and to help you keep your sense of connection.

Create structure.

Stability is a great way to combat both stress and depression. Sit down with your partner and decide when you will work from home, when you will plan mealtimes or exercise, and any other important moments of the day. Even a loose schedule can be a great coping mechanism. In addition, don’t forget to divide the household chores if you haven’t already, ensuring that neither of you does the majority of the work alone.

Practice effective communication.

It’s difficult to practice patience when you’re stressed, but try to express yourself in a positive way no matter how bad things get. Avoid communication pitfalls, like raising your voice, verbal attacks, complaining instead of problem solving, and not truly listening to what the other is saying. Your goal should be to treat your partner with kindness and empathy whenever possible—especially now, when the one thing you can control is how you treat each other.

Look at this as an opportunity to grow your relationship.

If you and your significant other don’t often get to spend time together due to busy work or social lives, this can be a great opportunity to have in-home dates. Learn new things via an online class, give each other massages, cook together and dine by candlelight, or tour a museum virtually. Spending time trying to get to know each other on a deeper level can help you maintain a sense of purpose and fun during your isolation.

Maintaining a healthy relationship is something you’ll need to constantly work on, but it will be more crucial than ever to support each other in the coming days. Despite the hardship or stress you feel now, focusing on your relationship may help the two of you emerge stronger than before when all is said and done.

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